DANIEL BOONE HOME

Our state is full of places that hold “homeschool days” and places that give cheaper tickets/better seats to homeschool kids. I’ve always wanted to live a million other places, (not that anything is wrong with our state, it’s just in my nature to want to be anywhere but where I am), but I have yet to find a place better suited for the way we homeschool than here.

The Daniel Boone home was having a homeschoolers-only day last week! We planned this a month in advance so that Zack could make sure he was able to go with us. So, the four of us took the drive and made a day out of it (and it didn’t rain!).

The first thing we did when we arrived, was a garden scavenger hunt/nature drawing. Zack joined in, too!

Afterward, they got to color their sketches and we got to guess the names of unique vegetables (we did pretty good!).

Zack was enthralled with this old kiln. It stood next to a potter’s house (an actual house no one used, of course).

Our favorite part was the woodshop! The three guys presenting in the shop were all funny and very informative. We could’ve spent an afternoon hanging out there.

The church was so beautifully restored. Zack could’ve spent a good deal of time exploring the little details – even the clock was incredible!

The church station involved music. The group before us played a different song, and we could tell the lady took time to make her lesson historical and interesting. We all learned what a limberjack is and the girls got to ‘play’ one along with the song. She sang a rhyme from the late 1700s while playing the dulcimer. She was such a happy and fun lady.

The girls got to make Indian cakes (old fashioned donuts, basically) and learn about open hearth cooking and watch their food being fried in front of them, in a really old cabin! The ladies at this station were a lot of fun, also – and so patient with the kids!

Mae’s face! Zack’s face!

The girls put honey and cinnamon sugar on their Indian cakes. Most kids stayed and ate their donut at the table, but a new group of kids had just walked over, so we took ours to the house that was paired with the cabin. It was breezy and quiet and just about the loveliest snack time there ever was.

Next stop for us (it was a go where you want when you want situation) was the Inn. They had a display of rifles from the era, a lesson on different guns and their purposes back then, and a demonstration (just powder, no bullet) of the loading and firing of the rifle which I’m sure Zack remembers the name of, but I don’t, sorry. It was loud!

The man said they also bring out the canon sometimes! That would’ve been cool, too.

Rae was hot, so the girls ate their lunch on the porch and then we took a tour of the two-room Inn. Also very interesting! Particularly, the beds/bedroom. The dining area (one of the two rooms) was cool, too, but Rae wanted to go sit down again, so I left with her. I hear Mae liked it.

At the General Store, we learned about the traveling of the wooden shoe from Holland to France and then to the states. The original steel-toed boot. (The Dutch brought them over too, they just pretty well stayed in and around Pennsylvania).

We also learned about currency in those days. He lived in the time when the treasury was being established but it would be a while until it spread out this far west, anyway. He supplied paper money from Rhode Island, Connecticut, and other areas in various amounts- which led to a talk about bartering versus trading.

The girls got to learn about grinding up corn and wheat to make flour and they each got a turn grinding up corn for cornmeal and learned where grits come from!

I didn’t take any photos of the candle dipping station, ’cause it was packed with tons of kids, but the girls each got to dip their own candles (which we’ll either keep for memories or use this fall)!

After that, we were pretty exhausted, but we walked next door to the final place, Daniel Boone’s home (He only lived in Missouri the last twenty years of his life – which I learned from Google, not the tour). We couldn’t miss seeing the big ol’ house.

This girl was also tops at her engaging storytelling and questioning skills!

We bailed at the kitchen tour. We let the girls spend some of their money at the gift shop before taking the long drive home.

– There was also a dressmaking station where they learned about wool, making yarn from it, and they got to make a craft. It was crowded, so we skipped it. Mae was bummed, but maybe we’ll go there first next year.